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Lakefront Cabins? Waterfront? Lakeside? Lake View? Lake Access? What does Lake Whitney really offer?

If you spend very much time searching for accommodations on Lake Whitney you are likely to find a variety of descriptive terms used to describe cabins and their relationship to the lake.

Lake Whitney is a flood control lake with a 40 foot flood pool above the official "normal" level. That means that nothing but campsites situated on Corps of Engineers property can be located in the flood zone. That also means no cabins or houses sit right next to the water on Lake Whitney.
This is a Corps of Engineers Park with the water level just a few feet above normal, but you can see that the water is in their parking lot.
Almost all properties on the lake adjoin land owned by the Corps of Engineers. These properties are considered "lakefront," but since in almost all cases there is public land between the private property line and the water's edge, there are very few "waterfront" properties on the lake. In fact I only know of one area that can claim to be "waterfront" and that only happens when the lake is at or above the normal level of 533' (which is rare) because they are located far up into tiny fingers beyond the normal Corps of Engineers boundaries that surround the lake.


Those properties have no lake access at all when the water level is below normal. Lake Whitney is a deep lake (108' in the center) but it stays below the designated normal by 8-10 feet most of the time.

With that in mind, the only two "lakefront" or "lakeside" accommodation choices are:
  • Perched atop limestone cliffs out of the flood area, but directly above the water.
  • On sloping hillsides back away from the water's edge. 







The questions you should ask when determining which accommodations work best for you are:

Exactly how do you access the water from the the cabin?
How far is it to the water?
What is the shoreline like at their location? Smooth? Rocky?
Is it possible to swim?
Is it possible to tie up my boat?
Is there a view of the water from the cabin I have in mind?
Is there a public area with a view of the lake?



Here at Arrowhead we are on a sloping hillside, not a cliff. That means we have easy access to a smooth shoreline. We have a trail that is about 150 yards down the hill to the water. Once at the shore, you have full access to several miles of  non-rocky shoreline at your disposal.

Because we are not in a cove, we have a wide view of open water from most of the property. Some cabins have better views than others, but there is lots of public space from which to enjoy the view.

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